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of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we successfully built for the war and the peace conference disintegrate. iran had been helpful, rebuffed offers of further help. pakistan had at least been not actively and helpful but we failed to keep them up to that standard in the succeeding years. the third error which i failed to perceive was a failure to pursue reconciliation much earlier than we finally did. there were certain proportion of the taliban leadership that were prepared to be coopted and that would have collaborated new arrangements and instead we send them to guantanamo and send very negative signals to those who might consider coopting and being coopted into the new system and it took us almost a decade to reverse that policy. nevertheless, despite these problems and despite the fact that now more than ten years on, we are still engaged in a counterinsurgency campaign. we have come a long way than many of us realize and i think some of this is reflected in a recent poll the asia society put out a couple weeks ago which showed in disti
responsibility in the aftermath of the fall of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we had successfully built for the war and for the peace conference to disintegrate. iran had been very helpful. week rebuffed offers of further help. pakistan had at least then not actively and helpful. but we failed to keep them up to that standard in the succeeding years. the third error which i failed to perceive was a failure to pursue reconciliation much earlier than we finally did. there were a certain proportion of the taliban leadership that were prepared to be cooperative, that would have collaborated. instead, we sent them to guantanamo, and sent a negative signal to those who might consider who being coopted into the new system. it took us almost a decade to reverse that policy. nevertheless, despite these problems, and despite the fact that now, more than 10 years on, we are still engaged in a counterinsurgency campaign in afghanistan, i think we have come a longer way than many of us realize. some of this is reflected in a recent poll the asia s
in 2009. taliban will be given a seat at table and allowed to open an office in qatar. the taliban must first renounce terrorism. >> bret: we talked about what the troop number will be at the end of 2014. what is the going thinking on that. what about the concern about protecting those troops if the number is very low? >> well, absolutely. what we have confirmed is general john allen, the top commanderrer in afghanistan given the national security team around the president three options. 9,000 option, 6,000 option. and 3,000 option. the president will likely decide on 3,000 to 6,000 troops and that will not give you much option in terms of the training and assisting the afghanistan security forces. they will set up bases to deal with al-qaeda if fringe area along the border. >> bret: we'll follow it. jennifer griffin at the pentagon. thank you. do you think the president should speed up the process of having afghan take control of the security? let me know on twitter. to me at bret baier. the politics, west virginia senator rockefeller will not seek a sixth term. the leader of the congr
to shape where the taliban goes because, of course, its internal issue is that the afghan taliban began to actually seed and grow in insurgency inside pakistan that they had to deal with, and i think that's fundamental. the troops on the ground don't necessarily help us solve that problem. other issues, money and other elements of state, will help us influence pakistan. >> what do we know about conversations between the karzai regime and the taliban, the negotiations in france? >> well, president karzai during our interview said that they are currently still in negotiations and talking to the taliban, but there hasn't been any proof that they actually have been because the taliban themselves they send emails and talk to us on the phone as journalists and they tell us that in no way will they talk to what they call the puppet regime of america, referring to president karzai in his government, but the afghan officials that we speak to, they say that they are currently talking to the taliban, but they may be. we just don't know what level of the taliban that they're talking to. >> i know t
army. despite the billions spent and the thousands of lives lost, the taliban has not been defeated. some say at the america pulls out too quickly, it will be trade promises made and leave afghanistan vulnerable. >> it will be difficult to engage down the road if there is a large al qaeda return or the taliban takes over the country, to get the afghanistan's to trust us when we say we will be there to help you. >> america described it as the final chapter in afghanistan. president obama downsized out of the ambitions, winding down the war that is increasingly unpopular at home. this is not the final chapter. that is just that americans have grown wary about spending the money and spilling the blood. >>> for more on the future of the u.s. mission, i spoke a short time ago with the former u.s. ambassador to afghanistan. ambassador, thank you very much for coming in. president obama says that things are going so well he can actually speed up the transition. are the afghan security forces really ready to take over in the spring or is this more a matter of expediency for both countries?
their camps. taliban infiltration is often to blame. the tactic is to undermine the relationship between afghan forces and the coalition partners, making it more difficult for the afghan military to take over security here. president karzai arrived in washington today. mapping out afghanistan's future after foreign combat troops have left. their meeting will determine the primary mission, to fight the taliban or to get rid of al qaeda. president karzai wants soldiers. his forces lead emissions across the country. they are still not ready. for many years to come, these soldiers in afghanistan generally will rely on america's support. >> for more on those meetings taking place, i spoke with peter bergen. what is the main sticking point in these meetings between what the white house wants and what president karzai wants? >> it is the question of immunity for american forces. the u.s. does not want its soldiers being prosecuted by an afghan accords for obvious reasons. this is a big sticking point. >> karzai would like that? >> yes. that is very much what he would like. and then there is the
after nearly being killed by the taliban. tonight she's walking and inspiring people around the world. >>> and what's wrong with this picture? what happened after the women of the hill posed for a photo and why it's getting so much attention tonight. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >> good evening, i'm lester holt in tonight for brian, who will be back monday. a lot of americans are spending this first week of the new year flat on their backs, taken down by the flu in numbers we typically wouldn't see until much later in the winter. and according to the centers for disease control, those numbers are rapidly climbing with a peak nowhere in sight. the government reports as of a week ago, flu cases were widespread in 41 states. that's 10 more states and a week earlier. what's more, this flu strain appears to be a particularly nasty one. it's even proven deadly in a handful of cases involving the young. nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell starts us off tonight with more. >> have you ha
as taliban momentum, and to give ourselves a bridge force to give us time to build up afghan security forces did i reluctantly come to the conclusion we're going to need more western forces, probably mostly american. we came up with detailed analysis on what we had to secure to be effective, and the requirement was for 40,000 forces. and so we recommended that which followed not long after our strategic assessment. >> rose: after the number of troops had already come in because of mckernen. >> yes. some of those forces hadn't yet arrived. >> rose: then you went to london. >> yes. >> rose: and you make a speech. the speech is okay. then there's a q&a session. >> yes. >> rose: and you say what. >> rose: i went to london at the request of the british government to engage parts of both their media and their government to explain the strategy. at that time we were executing a strategy that i had derived a mission strategy i derived from president obama's public statements his speeches in the spring when he authorized more forces and my understanding of what it is my mission was which had beg
pursuing peace talks with the taliban. as part of that process, the karzai government has urged pakistan to release more taliban fighters. four were freed last week after more than two dozen were released in the past few months. whatever comes of the peace efforts, president karzai said again today, he plans to step down next year. >> certainly, i will be a retired president and very happily in retirement. >> woodruff: karzai has been dogged by charges of fraud since his re-election, part of larger concerns about corruption in his government. he acknowledged the concerns today, and said he hopes for a proper election to name his successor. >> brown: we pick up on today's meeting with two men with extensive experience in managing u.s.-afghan relations. said jawad was afghanistan's ambassador to washington from 2003 to 2010. before that, he was president karzai's chief of staff. and peter tomsen was a career diplomat who served as special envoy on afghanistan during the george h.w. bush administration. he's the author of "the wars of afghanistan." peter tomsen, let's start with you. what j
name malvi, a taliban commander. as far as i could tell, it was a perfectly legal and good thing to do, but the blowback on the ground is something that -- can be furious and last friday i was at the pentagon talking to the joint chiefs legal advisor who we talked about this at length. one of the things that they try to do as they analyze and propose strike, what's the blowback going to be. >> on the ground. >> on the ground. you can hit a guy in the house, but if all the neighbors -- if that causes them to go join the taliban, you know, you have taken a big step backwards. he was trying to persuade me that they pay attention to that when they're looking at a proposed strike, but the problem is how can do you that from washington? very, very difficult. the evidence so far is in yemen, for example, enormous blowback. you know, the analysis that i've seen is that we've caused more harm than good there. >> ben, i wonder, the other -- there is blowback regionally, but there has been such a lack of discussion here, and i remember the "new york times" kill list story that raised hackles in t
, you face different levels of [inaudible] the province is quiet. the taliban are not operating. there's less threat against you and your family. therefore despite the inferences being made, we still have challenges to recruit a member -- members of the security forces from those provinces. we purposely go and try to recruit students from the south or places [indiscernible] since the school system was not to this standard, i does not matter. we're not successful to bring them as much as we want. >> do you want to talk about these issues? >> in terms of who revises the afghan national army, in 2001, we had a plethora of offers. the pakistani, the indian, and the iranian fradkin to me and said it wanted to collaborate. i thought that we ought to try to devise some arrangement in which i and some limited aspects, countries could participate. others in the administration were opposed to any iranian role. relations between pakistan and india were at a nadir. coins and with 9/11 and the subsequent bond process, a pakistani base -- terrorist group had conducted a large- scale terrorist attack
said the taliban and al qaeda are two different elements. if we stay after killing bin laden, we have lost our purpose. he said the worst thing we can do is get bogged down without getting out. it wasn't that long ago, but it was interesting to look back a year and eight months ago to when bin laden was killed. i mean, at the time, anybody else think that maybe that would have meant we would come home from afghanistan? it seemed like one of the real possibilities that opened up with that almost unbelievable news on that cold night in may. but we did not leave afghanistan after this happened. this was roughly 600 days ago. we've got another 700 days ahead of us before the white house says this war will officially end, nearly two years from now. but how many american troops are left there between now and then? and what are those troops expected to do? how much fighting are they going to be doing? how much of our 11 and a half yearlong war is going to continue to result in americans getting hurt and killed between now and then? all of that remains to be decided. what is going to happen i
assassinated for challenging the taliban has gotten out of the hospital. we'll tell you about her story up next. >>> she challenged the taliban and nearly died for. it well, tonight the teenage pakistani girl who survived an assassination attempt is out of a pressure hospital. >> rita nissan -- out of auburn hospital. >> rita nissan has the story. >> reporter: 15-year-old malala walked slowly but steadily holding a nurse's hand as she left the hospital. she hugged and thanked the medical staff and waved good- bye almost three months after a taliban gunman shot her in the head at point blank range. the shooting happened in northwest pakistan. the taliban attacked malala leaving school. the terror group targeted the teenager because she openly challenged the taliban's efforts to deny education and other rights to women. malala was flown to queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham which has treated hundreds of soldiers injured in the wars in afghanistan and iraq. malala will continue to come to this hospital for outpatient therapy. in a few weeks from now she'll be readmitted here for reconstructiv
the taliban out of their holds. today, most major cities and most afghans are more secure than insurgents have continued to lose territory. meanwhile, afghan forces continue to grow stronger. as planned, some 352,000 afghan soldiers and police are now in training or on duty. most missions are already being led by afghan forces. and of all the men and women in uniform in afghanistan, the vast majority are afghans who are fighting and dying for their country every day. we still face significant challenges. but because this progress, our transition is on track. at the n.a.t.o. summit last year, we agreed with our coalition partners that after beg afghan forces in 2013. the president has been here and we've consulted with coalition partners and continue to do so. today we agreed that as afghan forces take the lead and as president karzai announces the final phase of the transition, coalitions forces will move to a support role this spring. our troops will continue to fight alongside afghan forces as needed, but starting this spring our troops will have a different mission, training, advising, assi
-- liberating afghanistan from an invasion and a rule by the taliban. the first one, in reverse order, the first one freeing afghanistan happened within a month and a half to two months. subbing squect of that afghanistan began its journey towards democracy, the rule of law, progress in all aspects of life. it went all right. it went reasonablely good under the circumstances. without a doubt with the help of the united states and our other allies around the world. the second part, freeing us all from terrorism and radicalism, didn't work as swiftly as we expected. there was bumps along the road and setbacks. now, the afghan people regardless where they stand recognize that afghanistan could not have made the progress that we have made in the past 10 years without the help we received from our allies. led by the united states of america. in more cruder terms the u.s. taxpayer's money. it contributed to afghanistan's upliftment. it contributed to the workplace, to society, to policy, the return of young girls to education. the return of universities, roads, communications, mobile phones, computers
about is that from our perspective, it is not possible to reconcile without the taliban renouncing terrorism, without them recognizing the afghan constitution, and recognizing that if there are changes that they want to make to how the afghan government operates, then there is an orderly constitutional process to do that, and you can't resort to violence. the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women. and the united states strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. we believe that about every country in the world. and so, you know, we will continue to voice very strongly support for the afghan constitution, its protection of minorities, its protection of women, and we think that a failure to provide that protection, not only will make reconciliation impossible to achieve, but also would make afghan -- afghanistan's long-term development impossible to achieve. the single best indicator or one of the single best indicators of a country's prosperity around the world is how does it treat its women. does it educate that half
will the taliban plal in the future of that country. and what role will the united states play after we end our combat mission? how many troops will we keep behind in afghanistan to keep that country secure if we can? jim moran is a democrat congressman from virginia and westmore is a retired army captain and author of "the other wes moore. i guess the question comes down to numbers. 66,000 troops in country right now. what should be it be five years from now. >> i think we're going to initially withdraw to 6,000 troops in 2014. i think a lot of work will be done by contractors, not u.s. troops, but we can't afford to continue spending the kind of money we're spending. you know, we have spent $557 billion up to today, half a trillion dollars, and what have we gotten for it? burma, somalia, and afghanistan are the three most corrupt nations in the world, and now almost 90% of that corruption is coming from american taxpayers' money. you'd be shocked at the amount of american taxpayers' money that's being spent over in dubai because it came in to afghanistan. this is a nation that's -- a governme
and taliban takeover. as for president karzai, he said he would like to see levels around 15,000 but today suggested numbers are less important than u.s. cooperation and supplying the them with tanks and drones. how much will it all cost? already the u.s. and allies pledged $16 billion in civilian aid and military ops on top of $642 billion the u.s. spent since 9/11 and 2,100 u.s. lives lost. let's start with kristen welker. what are you hearing came out of the meeting? >> reporter: a couple of headlines out of today's meeting. the withdrawal plans have been accelerated a bit. both announcing that u.s. troops handing over control to afghan forces this spring. that is a few months earlier than expected so that means that u.s. troops will shift their role in afghanistan. they will be taking on a role of advising, assisting and training afghan forces. president obama making it very clear, though, u.s. troops will still be in harm's way if they continue to be in the country. the big question mark remanes, how many troops are in afghanistan after 2014? today, president obama not answering that
have problems with the taliban. the u.s. does believe there has been considerable problem with the influence of the taliban on afghan cause political culture. >> in venezuela, military jets give the salute to president hugo chavez. he was supposed to be sworn in for a fourth term on thursday but remains in cuba, where he is recovering from cancer surgery. that did not stop thousands of supporters and regional leaders from taking part in a rally in the capital. >> i am chavez was the message on the streets. thousands of people gathered to show their support for the man they called their commander. thursday should have been inauguration day, but it turns into a show of force for the party. >> we love chavez. we know he is our leader. he has given to venezuela all his love. he has given our country the respect it has lost. >> people are hoping the president will recover. chavez is still in cuba after undergoing his fourth cancer surgery. there has been an ongoing debate about who is running the country. >> we came here to defend the constitution, that says he can be sworn in
be an option that would probably lead to an afghan government under pressure from taliban, perhaps, al qaeda. you know the world in a vacuum i think that would start to leave a vacuum by the government to be filled by taliban for sure and result in afghanistan that is found before the turn of the century. >> you would recommend against it? >> if i were still in office yes, i would. i think there's potential in afghanistan to make the place a lot more secure with the afghan forces but it will take more time than we have currently. >> why do you think the white house may see it differently? >> i think part of it is there's always a tension between getting afghans to take responsibility for their own actions, and making sure they're doing all they can and not overly relying on u.s. and allied forces. i think part of what we're seeing is playing out probably in the media here is to put some pressure on the karzai government to be realistic about their expectations and make sure afghans are doing all they can to ensure their own security. >> what might come out of the karzai
lives there. she was attacked by the taliban if you will remember for challenging the terrorist group's efforts to deny other rights for women. the taliban still says they will try to target her again. >>> and still ahead, mixed news on those new unemployment numbers. a little later on as we check in with the redskins. see how they are getting ready for sunday's big game against the seahawks of seattle. >>> and coming up next, a little boy gets the thrill of the young life when his favorite super hero turns out to be his all-time favorite hero. >>> if you don't have it yet, you want to be sure to download the brand new iphone app. it's got news on your fingertips and live interactive weather maps, just like the one that topper is using all for free. it is also available for the kindle fire and some other android tablets. >>> all right employment rate is still at 7.8% tonight. even though they added 155,000 jobs last month. it just wasn't enough to drop the jobless rates. the biggest gain is health care, food service, manufacturing, construction. still more than 12 million americans ar
weeks with u.s. special forces hunting taliban militants. good afternoon. >> hi, how are you doing? >> shepard: he blames us for everything. why in the world would the president talk to him? >> you have to watch his game. he is looking forward to releasing all of the 3,000 or so prisoners while u.s. forces are busy putting them in jail. he knows he will not get the north so he decided to bring the taliban back into the government. these things won't be discussed too openly as he begs president obama to keep troops there and i think he will have to relent on the u.s. troops being is subject to afghan law because we will just pull out of there. >> shepard: the goal has been the most recent goal in a series of goals in afghanistan has been to put afghan security forces back in charge of things. you have are been over there for five weeks looking at it. how is that going? >> very badly. the army and the police are one of the main problems they have because they are causing problems in the more remote regions. when i was there we had a group of u.s. trained afghan police battling u.s. t
're living right now in the united kingdom because the taliban says it would shoot her again. malala became a target after she campaigned for women in afghanistan. my friend and colleague has been covering the story since the beginning. good of you to come in on this saturday. first of all, remarkable recovery. how is she doing? >> she's doing well by all accounts. sources close to her say she's recovering well. this girl was shot in the head at point-blank range and she's only 15 years old. so by all accounts, being able to walk out of the hospital in her own two feet is a major milestone when it comes to her recovery. she's got a physical recovery to make after a long surgery and hopefully at the end of this month and then, of course, there's a psychological recovery and there's a lot of trauma when it comes to being shot by the taliban and this girl has a long road ahead of her. >> she's committed to her fight for education in pakistan. will they come back? >> it doesn't look like it right now. certainly they've been saying and pakistani officials have been saying, but they want to go ba
night raids to kill and capture taliban leaders. you have to do that from multiple bases . these options will not be able to be fulfilled and meet those obligations . >> a recent pentagon report shows that one of afghan army 23 brigades was able to operate without military support from the u.s. or nato. you expect it to improve by 2014? >> i think the whole engagement is catastrophic and you look at the harvest of what we have done and look at sacrifices of the last 12 years now we had in afghanistan. we don't have much to show for it. we have a karzai as president . dysfunctional units that made habits . the afghan sold yirs were killing our own people and hundreds of billions later, the the fatalities and casuallies. it is it a good wor. but there is nothing good about the war. the chaos will claim afghanistan and the taliban will claim afghanistan and our work will have been for naught. >> that is it a sobering picture that you paint there. thank you for your insight. i appreciate it >> you, too. >> and rebel sitings are pressing ahead with fencive. there is a car boiming in damascus
afghanistan to launch attacks against our country. at the same time, we pushed the taliban out of their strongholds. today, most major cities and most afghans are more secure and insurgents continue to lose territory. afghan forces continue to grow stronger, meanwhile. as planned, some 352,000 afghan soldiers and police are now in training or on duty. most missions are already being led by afghan forces. of all the men and women in uniform in afghanistan, the vast majority are afghans who are fighting and dying for their country every day. we still face significant challenges, but because this progress our transition is on track. last year we agreed with partners that afghan forces will take the lead for security in mid 2013. president karzai and his team have been here for several days, we have consulted with our coalition partners, and we will continue to do so, and today we agreed that as afghan forces take the lead and as president karzai announces the final phase of the transition, coalition forces will move to a support role this spring. our troops will continue to fight
valley, that's an area which had been controlled by the taliban just three years ago in the pakistani army came in, launched a sweeping operation to push them out but in recent months we've seen the taliban creeping back in a couple of weeks ago, a couple of months ago, rather we had an attack on the pakistani school girl malala yousafzai who was shot by the taliban and today we had this attack on a religious congregation hundreds had gathered to hear a leader speak in the main town and the death toll in that attack was 22 and was seen as another sign the taliban was not back in swat, certainly starting to reassert their authority there. >> pelley: there was a third attack in pakistan today, this one also in quetta. who was the target? >> earlier today there was a bomb attack on a pakistani paramilitary patrol in the center of quetta. that attack was carried out by a nationalist group that later claimed control -- rather that later claimed responsibility for attack. the ethnic nationalists have been fighting against the pakistani army, against the state for about seven or eight years
taliban fighters who attacked u.s. forces in afghanistan. five other people were killed in the strike, including one of his aides. >>> we know that dallas cowboys lineman josh brent had a blood-alcohol limit twice the legal limit during his accident. but now an autopsy found that brown was sober at the time of the crash. his blood-alcohol was 0.056, well below the legal standards. >> neither wearing seat belts, as well. >>> another sports story, an inspiring one from southern new jersey. josh berelli is star of his high school team, averaging over 20 points in the game and suffers from a condition that causes rashes and lesions. all he can do is take medication and spend eight minutes a day in a tanning booth. there will be much more on this story coming up on "good morning mech." i believe he was the first diagnosed case in the united states and they really don't know a lot about this. very, very rare. >> no one has even heard of it. >> and it clears up. he was in remission, now he's suffering another setback. >>> here's a look at your friday forecast. flurries in weste
troops would weaken the negotiating position about those negotiations with the taliban ever got started again. now, the taliban, that's been one of their demands. all u.s. troops leave afghanistan after 2014. and there are some who feel the white house 234r0floated this io sort of, you know, lay the ground work to get some perhaps concessions on some other issues that are important to the white house. in other words, more of a negotiati negotiati negotiating ploy. >> it's been a tense relationship on many occasions. be interesting to know how this meeting goes in that regard. also he's the guy they have to deal with. he's the only player they really can deal with. but the reality is he still doesn't run much of afghanistan in the real world environment. and the lingering allegations of corruption, nepotism, hangs over his head. >> his brother and father were assassinated, so in some ways he's also trying to stay alive in that country. and facing that possibility, as well. it's been a contentious relationship with karzai over the years. he's had better relationships with some of the gene
is still around. >> indeed, he is. at least nine people suspected to be taliban fighters are dead after a suspectedu drone strike in pakistan's tribal areas. the target, three taliban compounds. it is believed two major commanders are among the dead, in the unsupervised bomb squads. that's the third u.s. drone strike in five days itch there was a sharp divide in congress between those who voted for the fiscal cliff bill and those who did not -- taxes versus spending. but will those differences come up again in the debt ceiling debate? we have jeff duncan, a republican from south carolina, and representative elliot engle, a democrat from new york. gentlemen, thank you for joining us. representative duncan, you voted against the fiscal cliff deal. tell us why? >> absolutely. we are not in this situation in america with our economy and our government because we have under-taxed americans. we are here because we spend too much money. this plan had over $40 of tax revenue increases for every dollar that was cult. it should be $44 for cuts fur every dollar increased. >> you voted for the deal
the taliban and has been if that is a friend who needs an enemy kind and a half. today the white house to talk about our nation's longest war. specifically when and how we will get out of there finally. that is the question from many afghans. but the president of afghanistan wants to talk about the circumstances. so they will and we will report in just a moment. this s "studio b." and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. >> shepard: the former governor of new mexico bill richardson is back in the united states after he made a trip to north korea with the google chairman eric schmidt. the state department criticized the visit as unhelpful and basically told they don't go but they went anyway. they pushed nort north north kp missile launches and nuclear tests and called on the regime to allow more cell phones and internet access. he also said he asked for fair and humane treatment for an american citizen detained in north korea. he joins us now. also the former energy secretary a
for the pakistani girl who fought for education for other girls and was shot by the taliban. >> of the springfield hey, look! a shooting sr! make a wish! i wish we could lie here forever. i sh this test drive was over, so we could head back to the dealership. [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. test drive! but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0irst month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit today. >> it seems the serial groper may have struck again. >> it has been a few weeks, but the latest incident occurred yesterday on briarwood court. >> natasha barrett is live and annandale with the latest. >> all of the other incidents have happened in springfield right before christmas and earlier in the fall, but the man behind this does it the same way every time. he takes advantage of women by themselves, either early in the morning or at night. this time it happened i
by a taliban gunman is out of the hospital malala yousafzai was shot in the head. the attack prompted international outrage, and at the girl became a symbol of courage and hope for many trade issue will continue to receive outpatient care as she works to fully recover. adam caskey here. a brisk morning. but good things ahead. >> things will slowly warm up over the next couple of days. closer to 50 by the middle part of next week. >> i will take a 50. >> it will come with some rain. we could use some moisture. sorry, scott. this is culpeper earlier this morning right around the sunrise. thank you for posting that on my facebook page. look at that northwesterly wind, about 10 miles per hour. at times it feels like 30, and with the highest costs, it feels like the upper 20s -- the highest guessts, it feels like the upper 20s. this is frostburg, maryland. still plenty of snow on the ground in frostburg. the tarp from the construction site is flapping in the wind there. 22, the low temperature at dulles airport. the reason i am sharing this with you is is the call this morning so far this
-s wanted assurances that thh taliban ould not be allowed to set u shop leave. i can assure you mr. will, with the help that you providee be able to provide security to it's people aad to protect it's borders tte obama administrrtion warns not to presidents and theer wo -oop 3 delegations at the white house ... as thh two ides movv closer to ending the eleven year war on terror in afghanistan. i'm ed payne reporting. haaf of the world's food... is put to waste. waste.that'' according to a new study... by the mmchanical engineers.thee of - found that eech year... more are produced... nd that od - customers end up throwing away as much aa half of what they 3uy at the store. - tailgatinn alwayssssarts eaaly when you are following the purple friddy caravan. but this ttme it's more justifiee then ever.... instead offwaiting until sunday, the ravens are challenggng the broncos tomoorow at 4:30. pn white marsh to see why the fans think this timm will be different when ii comes to the last ttme... ton vs. ray lewiss 3 3 3 p, coming up oo the early edition... a supee-herr spotted... oot
billion for them to be due to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic increase -- a decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. $4,000,000,000.5000000000 dollars for them to continue to host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a draw on strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. babalu remain a threat in that area for the force -- that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the worl
the taliban renouncing terrorism, without them recognizing the afghan constitution, and recognizing that if there are changes they want to make to how the afghan government operates, then there is an orderly constitutional process to do that, and that you cannot resort to violence. the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women. and the united states strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. we believe that a about 3 -- we believe that about every country in the world. we will continue to voice very strongly support for the afghan constitution as protection for minorities, its protection of women, and we think that a failure to provide that protection not only will make reconciliation impossible to achieve, but also would make afghanistan's long term development impossible to achieve. the single best indicator or one of the single best indicators of a country's prosperity around the world is how does it treats its women. does it educate that half of the population? does it give an opportunity? when it does, you will poli
priorities backwards. if taliban takes control again in afghanistan, we won't have to worry about protecting drone bases or diplomats because we won't be there at all. and i think this is part of the unreality of the obama administration's approach there. the low troop numbers that they're contemplating, that they will be discussing with president karzai will not be any where near sufficient to accomplish our strategic objective, america's strategic objective which is defeating the taliban. and i think we're --. bill: it is fascinating. i apologize for the interruption how the events in benghazi are now shaping our foreign policy whether this administration wants to admit it or not. >> well that perhaps is the small glimmer of good news that they recognize that benghazi was a real debacle for our security policies for embassies overseas but the larger question here in afghanistan is the administration's unwillingness to do what we need to do to prevent 10 years of sacrifice and loss of life by our forces from simply being wasted if the taliban come back into power. bill: well this administra
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